World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

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Mission Statement

Our mission is to conserve nature and reduce the most pressing threats to the diversity of life on Earth.
Together we can challenge the threats to nature, and help ensure its ability to provide - for the sake of every living thing, including ourselves.

Description

Our work is focused around 6 ambitious goals with people at the center

WWF’s work has evolved from saving species and landscapes to addressing the larger global threats and forces that impact them. Recognizing that the problems facing our planet are increasingly more complex and urgent, we have refined the way in which we work around an ambitious new strategy. Our new strategy puts people at the center and organizes our work around six key areas: forests, marine, freshwater, wildlife, food and climate. By linking these six areas in an integrated approach, we can better leverage our unique assets and direct all our resources to protecting vulnerable places, species and communities worldwide.
People are at the center of our work because together we can change the trajectory of the threats to nature, and help ensure nature’s ability to provide—for the sake of every living thing, including ourselves.

We work globally, with every sector, at every level

To accomplish our ambitious goals, we work to educate and influence people into making sustainable choices and decisions, including those who work in business and make decisions around the use of natural resources, and those who work in government and set policy that impacts nature.
We work globally at every level—in the field and in the local community, from the halls of government to the global marketplace. One of WWF’s strengths is our ability to engage stakeholders—in business, civil society, and academia—in partnerships to devise innovative solutions to the issues that challenge us.
Working together with 1.1 million supporters, WWF’s partners, projects and experts are making a difference in creating a healthy future for our planet.

Program Details

Climate

WWF believes that strong action on climate change that grows our economy and strengthens our energy security begins with setting ambitious goals. That is why WWF is working with businesses, cities and national governments to set emissions reduction goals aligned what science says is needed. And because that strong low carbon economy needs to be powered by clean and cheap renewable energy, WWF is leading businesses and cities to make it very easy to buy.  With innovative strategies and partnerships WWF is building momentum for a low-carbon economy by:  
  • Helping companies to set and meet science-based targets
  • Urging America’s largest companies use their collective purchasing power to scale up renewable energy and bringing those lessons to help cities do the same.
  • Challenging all US cities to set ambitious goals, transition toward 100% renewable energy and address local climate threats
WWF works with local communities, governments, and others around the world to help people and nature prepare for the many impacts of a changing climate. To do this we:
  • Work with communities and governments to understand and prepare for climate change
  • Integrate environmental considerations into disaster recovery, reconstruction, and risk reduction
  • Study how people’s responses to climate change affect ecosystems and wildlife
  • Assess species to determine traits that make them resilient or vulnerable to changes in climate

Forests

Forests will not survive unless the responsible management of them becomes the norm. That requires eliminating illegal and unsustainable logging. To do so, WWF works to strengthen the US government’s ability to prosecute illegal timber cases; stop illegal logging in countries that export high volumes of timber; ensure full implementation of the Lacey Act, a US law that prohibits illegal timber and timber products from entering the US market; and design rural energy programs that rely on fuels other than firewood.
We tap into the power of US companies that buy and sell forest products. For example, through our Global Forest & Trade Network, we help US companies source products from responsibly managed forests, particularly those certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). We also encourage them to invest directly in increasing the acreage of responsibly-managed working forest and to help increase the demand for FSC-certified products.

Freshwater

WWF collaborates with local stakeholders and governments in critical river basins around the world to assess climate change vulnerability and plan interventions. Because institutions are central to the way water resources are managed, WWF also engages institutional partners to investigate how to most effectively adapt to climate change. By both working in the field, where many impacts are already being felt, and partnering with institutions, which influence water management decisions, we hope to safeguard a future where both human and environmental needs are met.
WWF helps governments, companies, investors, communities and others understand their water footprints and water-related risks. More importantly, we help our partners go beyond adopting water efficiency practices to becoming better water stewards. Water stewardship requires collaboration with all levels of government, local communities, and other industries in a basin—sometimes even competitors—to ultimately change how water is governed and embed the value of nature into business planning. We challenge businesses to think differently about water and to help us accelerate stewardship efforts because it’s good for business, it’s good for people, and it’s good for nature.
WWF also seeks to move water stewardship forward at a global level. We lead and support numerous ground-breaking initiatives, including the Alliance for Water Stewardship's standard, United Nations-supported Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI)’s work with investors, engagement with business sector sustainability initiatives, scientific assessments of how implementing commodity standards can benefit water quality and quantity, and water footprinting and mapping tools such as the Water Risk Filter. As part of the White House Climate Data Initiative, WWF committed to expanding, maintaining and sharing our research in partnership with leading technology companies. Such resources will empower industry, financiers and policymakers to strengthen global water stewardship, food security and climate resiliency.

Oceans

Where land meets a sea is often a place of spectacular biodiversity and ecological beauty. The coastal zone makes up only 10% of the ocean environment but is home to over 90% of all marine species. Coral reefs and mangrove forests provide people and nature with numerous benefits, but we’ve lost half of these ecosystems, and stand to lose even more from the pressures brought on by development and climate change.
WWF is working toward the goal of expanding the extent of mangrove cover 20% by the year 2030. This collaboration through the Global Mangrove Alliance leverages the knowledge, expertise and ongoing work of local, regional and global organizations to improve management and conservation efforts.
Mangrove ecosystems are closely connected to coral reefs, and WWF is focused on saving the reefs that are important to neighboring communities and have the best chance of surviving a warmer, more acidic ocean. From Coastal East Africa to the Coral Triangle, WWF is advancing our scientific understanding of coral reefs and creating the tools that support community-led conservation, which includes marine protected areas
Today, the Arctic is experiencing rapid and dramatic transformation. Warming is occurring faster here than anywhere on the planet. As sea ice vanishes, wildlife like polar bears lose vital feeding grounds and the ocean is opened to increased ship traffic and oil and gas exploration, putting nature and people at risk.
There are WWF staff on the ground in seven of the eight Arctic nations and we’ve been on-the-ground for 25 years, supporting local communities and collaborating with experts in science, policy, and planning. We work to strengthen Arctic-wide governance, advance climate-smart, sustainable development, and secure permanent protection for ecologically critical areas.
Fishing is one of the most significant drivers of declines in ocean wildlife. WWF is working around the world to scale improvements in fishing, reduce the catch of iconic ocean wildlife, and eliminate incentives for illegal fishing. WWF recognizes the Marine Stewardship Council standard as the leading certification program for wild-caught fisheries but not all fishing is ready for certification. WWF developed the fishery improvement project model to fill the gap and draw together stakeholders, assess what needs to improve, identify how the improvements will be made, and ultimately report back on progress. WWF is accelerating the transition by leveraging key pressure points in order to achieve improvements faster, such as working through fishing associations and regional bodies.

Wildlife

Conserving wildlife is at heart of our mission. We focus on protecting populations of some of the world’s most ecologically, economically, and culturally important species—the survival of which are threatened by poaching, illegal trade and habitat loss.
WWF uses our expertise in policy, wildlife trade, advocacy, and communications in an effort to stop wildlife crime in the US and around the world. At home, we ensure the US enacts tight ivory commerce restrictions. Partnerships with technology companies help us develop innovative ways to combat wildlife crime using everything from drones to infrared cameras that can detect poachers in the dead of night. To combat the trade in illegal wildlife products through web-based platforms, WWF has teamed up with e-commerce and social media companies to adopt a standardized wildlife policy framework for online trade.
  • Doubling the number of Tigers
WWF aims to double the world’s wild tiger population by 2022 (TX2). We’re working with world leaders to take action, focusing conservation efforts in key sites, raising funds to permanently protect landscapes, and supporting community-based conservation. Saving tigers is about more than restoring a single species. As a large predator, tigers play an important role in maintaining a healthy ecosystem. Every time we protect a tiger, we protect around 25,000 acres of forest—forests that sustain wildlife and local communities and supply people around the world with clean air, water, food, and products.
  • Empower People to Protect Wildlife
Over the last few decades, conservationists have come to understand just how central community involvement is to wildlife conservation success—and how important it is for communities to actively steward the natural resources around them to improve economic and social well-being. WWF’s community-based conservation work today reflects this fundamental reality. We work across a variety of communities and customize our work based on the specific needs and interests of a given place, taking into consideration each region’s particular set of conservation assets and challenges.
  • Closing Asia's Ivory Markets
Illegal killing of elephants for ivory decimates global populations. Estimates indicate that each year poachers slaughter close to 20,000 elephants, mostly for their tusks. Fueling this rampant poaching is a steady consumer demand for ivory. Overall, we see demand increasing in East Asian and Southeast Asian markets, with the greatest demand in China, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Thailand. WWF is working to shut down the illegal markets in Thailand, and helped end the legal ivory trade in China. By tackling these markets now as part of a pan-Asian approach, WWF aims to leverage China’s recent actions to ban the ivory trade to prevent further displacement of the current China ivory trade to nearby countries

Food

WWF works with partners to feed the world while conserving the Earth's precious natural resources. An effective food strategy must reduce food waste and food loss. In order to meet global food security needs, as well as the food demands of an increasingly affluent global population, we will need to both increase productivity and efficiency as well as reduce food waste.
  • Increase Supply of More Sustainably Sourced Food
WWF is dedicated to building innovations for sustainability. We support producer improvement projects for priority food crops and promote sustainable supply chain solutions for food companies. These business solutions help companies reduce environmental impacts, become more profitable and provide cases to shape the way we think about becoming more sustainable in the future.
  • Increase Demand of More Sustainably Sourced Food
WWF engages companies, platforms, sectors and governments to reduce key impacts of food production. This includes convincing priority companies and sectors to use purchases and investments to drive more sustainable food production.ccomplish our ambitious goals, we work to educate and influence people into making sustainable choices and decisions, including those who work in business and make decisions around the use of natural resources, and those who work in government and set policy that impacts nature.We work globally at every level—in the field and in the local community, from the halls of government to the global marketplace. One of WWF’s strengths is our ability to engage stakeholders—in business, civil society, and academia—in partnerships to devise innovative solutions to the issues that challenge us.Working together with 1.1 million supporters, WWF’s partners, projects and experts are making a difference in creating a healthy future for our planet.
Primary Issue
Climate Change
Secondary Issue
Land
Address
1250 24th Street, NW
Washington, DC 20037
United States
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